What Are the Different Types of Container Sizes?

The modern shipping container has been around since 1955. Malcolm P. McLean’s company started using the same truck trailers to move goods on both the highway and the sea. 

While the concept hasn’t changed much since then, the design options of the containers have changed. Now, you can find shipping containers in an array of sizes and designs. 

The trouble is, there are so many configurations that it’s tough to know which one is right for your needs. Read on to learn about your options for container sizes as well as the different types of containers.  

Common Shipping Container Sizes

The majority of shipping containers are 8 feet wide, so the height and length is what really separates them. 

The standard height for containers is 8.5 feet. But, high cube containers, which are 9.5 feet tall, are also considered standard.

The most common lengths for shipping containers are 20 and 40 feet long, so these are considered standard sizes. In fact, cargo ships are measured in TEUs, or twenty-foot equivalent units. The 20-foot container is so common it’s considered the base unit of measurement.  

You can also get containers in different lengths like 8, 10, 30, 48, and 53 feet. You can also get modified containers built to your specific dimensions, so the possibilities are endless. 

If you plan to use your container for highway transportation, you need to check the laws for your region before you buy a shipping container

There’s actually no federal length limit for truck tractor semi trailers, but there is a minimum length requirement. The minimum length requirement is different in every state, and ranges from 48 to 59 feet.  

Types of Shipping Containers

Standard dry containers are the most common type since they can handle most goods and cargo. 

Insulated and refrigerated containers have insulation in their walls which is why they’re great for produce, dairy, or meat. These two types of containers are both insulated except refrigerated units have a condenser that lets you control the temperature.  

High cubes are great for lightweight cargo because you can store more without adding any length. They’re also great for home or office conversions since there’s more head room for insulation or lighting.

Tunnel and side open containers have different door placements for easier access to the cargo. Tunnel containers have doors at both ends and side open containers have doors on the long side of the trailer. 

Open top containers don’t have a metal top, but you can cover them with a tarp. If you need to store or transport tall items, open top containers can help. 

Purchase Your Shipping Container Today

With such a wide range of container sizes and types, there’s a shipping container for practically every need. 

Whether you need a shipping container to transport your products or you need one for storage, Equipment Management Services can help. We offer new, used, and custom containers to clients near our Houston/Dallas locations and also all across the country, if feasible. 

To learn more about the shipping containers we offer, contact us today. 

Shipping Container VS. Sea Container: The Differences Explained

Historically wooden crates, sacks, and kegs were used to ship goods. World War II demanded an increased need for efficient shipping and in 1956 Malcolm McLean started what is now the modern-day shipping container industry. He created a rectangular box that could be shipped by water, land, and sea.

Shipping containers have revolutionized the ways goods are moved both domestically and internationally. Read on to learn the difference between a sea container and a shipping container so you can choose the right one for your needs.

The Issue

With the boon of shipping container houses, bars, and off-grid dwellings, there has been an increase in the misuse of terms among professionals and laypeople alike.

According to the Intermodal Steel Building Units and Container Homes Association, there are only two types of shipping containers. The two types are Maritime Shipping Containers and ISBU Modules. Below are the definitions of each.

What is A Sea Container?

A sea container is a Maritime Shipping Container that ships by sea, rail, or land. This container meets additional structural and weight allowances to ensure that it is safe to travel in these environments. 

The ISO, an independent, non-governmental international organization, determines the specifications of a sea shipping container. These specifications will vary based on the cargo. For example, sea containers for dry goods are different than sea containers for liquid goods.

Sea containers are often new containers that are certified to meet the rigid standards set by the ISO. 

What is a Shipping Container?

A shipping container is any container for storage or any type of container for construction or building. These do not have to be ISO certified, although many are. While it is always nice to have a brand new container, if you are looking for a stationary structure for storage, it is often cheaper to buy a used container.

The drawback of used containers is that you must ensure that they are properly cleaned out of the material they previously hauled. Depending on the type of goods stored, this may be a more complicated process. It is important to choose a company that has a history in the industry if you are purchasing a used container.

What is the Difference Between the Two?

All sea containers are shipping containers but not all shipping containers are sea containers. When a container no longer meets the specifications for being able to be shipped at sea, then it can be used as a land-based container.

Often these are the containers that are repurposed as homes or off-grid storage or living facilities. 

Now that you understand the difference between a shipping and sea container, you can choose the right container for your companies needs.

Need a Sea or Shipping Container in TX?

With our long history in the industry and hubs in Houston and Dallas, we can provide you with the sea or shipping container you need. We make it our mission to hire the right people, who sell the right products, using the right systems to make our customers happy.

Contact us and our talented team will ensure your expectations are exceeded. 

Houston Shipping Containers Ready to Be Transported to Their Rightful Owners

Storage Containers for Sale: 4 Transportation Methods for Moving a Shipping Container

Moving a shipping container requires efforts from several different parties in order for everything to go smoothly. Lots of goods and cargo are stored in these containers, so efficiency, safety, and logistical parameters always must be taken into account.

So if you’re looking for transportation methods for container transport, you’re in the right place.

In this article, we’ll look at 4 methods you can use to make sure your experience goes as smoothly as possible.

1. By Truck

For shorter distances, you can totally move a shipping container by truck. They’re relatively easy to load onto a truck because they tilt at an angle, in-order to load and offload them. 

From a logistical standpoint, make sure to take into consideration the space neeeded to deliver your container to the end destination. Container delivery by truck is a cost-effective method, but may not be as efficient if you’re traveling long distances or delivering within close quarters.

2. By Train

This is a method that can work for your freight containers if both ends (start and finish) are near rail lines. Otherwise, it’ll probably cost too much and take too many logistical accommodations to make feasible.

When shipping by train you must always consider the type of cargo that is being sent. You will be required to have certain permits for each, and also may have to pay extra for a very heavy conex box.

3. By Boat

Shipping overseas? Need to move cargo long distances and have access to water? Then going by boat might be your best option. However, there are a handful of considerations unique to this option, too.

Is your container watertight? Depending on the shipping container’s make and how long it’s been used, the answer could be no. 

Do you have access to a company to move it in and out of the port? These are often very busy channels and may require extensive planning to initiate. If you need to ship a conex box last minute, the cost may be exorbitant.

Naturally, this option will work best if you’re shipping something halfway across the world. See this complete guide for sea shipping so you can determine if this is the right solution for you.

4. Outsourcing

Shipping a container can be a big hassle. If you’re new to the game or don’t really want to know how to move a shipping container, you may be able to outsource the project entirely. This option will no doubt cost the most — you’re not only paying for shipping, but cargo loading and other forms of manual labor. However, this is a very convenient one-stop solution if you don’t want to be involved first-hand.

Moving A Shipping Container

When moving a shipping container, you have several options. The most popular choices are by train, truck, or boat, and the nature of your situation will help determine which method is best for your needs.

If you want to be completely hands-off, you can outsource your entire project. At that point, you’ll be making your best guess regarding how your outsource team got it to the end destination.

Looking to buy shipping containers? Learn more about how our products can help you today.

Houston Shipping Containers Ready to Be Transported to Their Rightful Owners

Across the Globe: The Evolution of Intermodal Container Transport

In the not to distant past, the movement of even the smallest of goods (like a piece of jewelry or a child’s toy) could take multiple transitions through different shipping containers. These days, however, an inter-modal container can ship a product halfway around the world without ever opening its doors to the light of day.

The evolution of these convenient, adaptable containers is a fascinating one.

Intermodal Container History

The history of intermodal transportation begins before mixed goods containers were considered.

The true intermodal definition includes the transportation of goods across multiple modes of transportation without any handling of the goods themselves. 

To qualify, even roughly, as an intermodal container, a container needs to transport goods and be transported by several means. The modern definition implicitly states that containers handle multiple internal boxes.

The Ancient World

Go back far enough and freight was shipped in whatever happened to hold enough of it to be worth sending off without breaking. Sacks, barrels, and crates all served the purpose of keeping goods together from as far back as 3000 BCE.

Horses carried goods inland to boats and boats sailed short distances across the Mediterranean or other short waterways. The boats were unloaded and the sacks were loaded onto other horses and onward it went.

It isn’t until the 18th century that the idea of stacking containers onto each other created the first need for real intermodal designs.

First Containers

It probably won’t surprise anyone to learn that the first containers transported coal. This is a material needed in bulk at the outset of the Industrial Revolution, and it would, by necessity, look for the fastest routes.

Coal shipping boxes started out as wooden structures called tubs. These moved along canals through England in the last part of the 18th century. 

By the mid 19th century, the tubs would be transferred from a barge to a railway. While coal is a single commodity, the same container being used as both a transportation medium and storage made these tubs the first true intermodal containers.

At the dawn of the 20th century, covered containers made their debut. These could be transferred more easily between the now robust rail system and the emerging roadways.

Developing Standardization

As the transportation mediums scaled up in both speed and size, containers needed to standardize. 

This allowed loading equipment for the containers to be designed. This also allowed logistics supervisors to plan for usable space.

Amorphous shapes were harder to space evenly and could cause issues such as drag and sheer at even the low (by today’s standard) speeds of rail and trucks.

Early containers of the 1920s barely measured more than 5 x 10 feet. They were not sturdy enough for stacking and frequently had sloped and curved ceiling joists.

Major advances in containers built for speed and with a high strength to weight ratio came about in World War II. Military supplies needed to move quickly and the containers needed to weigh less than the supplies inside.

Piggyback transport was used by loading trailers onto rail-car flats. This was the fastest way to move cargo without ever touching it and without cranes.

With cranes, large railway companies began moving dedicated containers onto truck beds as early as the 1950s. 

Containerization

Cargo started to move from country to country and across the oceans. The volume of freight demanded that ports and railways be equipped to deal with containers from all over.

This lead to a standardization of sizes and categories of weight across international borders. The designation of containers, or containerization, gives a total set of dimensions and weight.

The European standard came first in 1933. The standardization of containers were introduced across two categories: heavy and light. Each type also allowed for differences in open and closed type containers. Heavy containers were limited at a mass of five tons, paltry by today’s needs. 

Since 1984, modern intermodal equipment providers have been using containers capable of double-stack transport. 

This technique allows rail cars to carry two containers at once with appropriate safety. Ships can stack containers higher as they have less overall inertia per container. 

Modern Day

Currently, intermodal transportation standards are set by the ISO. These lay out three common sizes based on the 20-foot length increments of ships and rail flats. Though standards exist, they are upper limits, not exact.

An intermodal container might be 20 feet in length but then have an irregular height and width. The height and width doesn’t cause problems when shifting from one transportation modality to another.

The designation of twenty-foot equivalent units (TEU) makes shipping records quick and easy to approximate. The three common sizes breakdown as follows:

  • high-cube: 40 x 8 x 9 and 6 inches
  • two TEU: 40 x 8 x 8 and 6 inches
  • one TEU: 20 x 8 x 8 and 6 inches

Variations on the height are most common with 4 and 3 inches appearing as a minimum range.

Internal equipment variations also exist. Most notably tankers, which have a standardized size in the outer shell but a rounded liquid container inside. Reefers, or refrigerated units, exist with the refrigeration units inside the container structure.

Finally, swap body containers are intended for free-standing offloads. These aren’t suitable to stack but have folding legs that make them usable without a crane.

Get Equipped

The history of intermodal container types isn’t as long as some technology. With only two hundred and fifty years beneath its belt, this tech has still manage to make major strides in capacity and speed.

If you need intermodal bulk containers for your freight needs, contact us for details on our stock and offerings

Tricks of the Trade: How to Buy Shipping Containers for Sale in Houston

If you want to build a minimalist home or expand your business, you may be looking for shipping containers for sale in Houston.

Whatever your reason for needing a shipping container, it’s easier than you think to buy one. We put together this simple guide to show you how you can purchase one for yourself or your business.

Keep reading to learn more about the steps you need to take before purchasing one or more shipping containers in Texas.

1. Know What You Need

The first thing you need to do is decide what you need in a shipping container. This will be determined by what you’re planning on using your container for.

If you’re using it for shipping goods, for example, you’ll need a different container compared to someone planning on using it as a backyard storage solution.

There are two main considerations to be made:

Size

There are several sizes of shipping containers available. Let’s take a quick look at the most common options you can choose from.

  • 40′ L x 8′ W x 8′ H
  • 20′ L x 8′ W x 8′ H
  • 40′ L x 8′ W x 8.5′ H

Whereas nearly all shipping containers are eight feet wide, you can find lengths of 8′, 10′, 24′, 30′, 45′, 48′, and 53′. However, these make up a fraction of the containers available.

Grade

Once you know how big you need your shipping container, it’s time to decide on what condition you need it in. Shipping containers come in four grades so you can pick the right one for your purpose.

New

Also known as one-trippers, these are containers that are made in a factory (typically overseas) and sent directly to your nearest port.These are ideal for businesses looking to ship products around the world as they will last the longest compared to other grades.

Certified

If you’re looking to save some money while buying for your business, consider getting certified or cargo-worthy containers. These are used shipping containers that can still be used in overseas shipping lines. However, because these won’t last quite as long as a new container, you may find yourself replacing them sooner than you’d like.

Wind and Water Tight

Once a shipping container is no longer able to be used for overseas shipping, it becomes listed as wind and watertight. That means they don’t have any large holes in the sides but often have some rust and dents from years of use. Many people looking to use shipping containers to build storage or living spaces choose this grade because they’re less expensive but still provide excellent protection against the weather.

As-Is

The lowest grade of shipping containers is those that have obvious problems that prevent them from being completely waterproof. They may have extensive rust, holes in the metal, or doors that don’t seal properly.For some people, this isn’t a problem when they’re being used as a storage shed or for those that have the tools and skills to fix any problems they run into.

2. Find Shipping Containers for Sale in Houston

Once you know what you’re looking for in a shipping container, it’s easy to find a company that will provide one for you. We offer shipping containers for sale and can also help with modifications if you’re going to use it for anything but shipping. That way, it’ll start serving its purpose as soon as it arrives on your property.

3. Prepare Your Site

Once you’ve done all of that, you’ll want to make sure your site is ready. This is particularly important if your container is going to be a permanent structure somewhere so you don’t have to worry about moving it later. The largest sizes of containers can only be moved with an industrial crane whereas smaller containers can be moved with a heavy-duty forklift.

Determine Location

First, you need to know exactly where you want your container to go. The area should be level and larger than the size of the container so the shipping company can maneuver it into place. You’ll also want to make sure the truck can safely and easily get to the location you want your container. It would be a shame for your container to arrive only to find out it can’t be immediately placed where you want it.

Know Where You Want the Doors

Make sure you also think about where the doors should face. Shipping containers have one set of large doors that are only at one end. Most often, the containers are loaded so that these doors are facing the front of the truck.

Keep this in mind as you prepare your site so you can determine how the truck will get your container to the site. In some cases, you can request the container to be loaded in the opposite direction to easily get it where you want it. If you’re not planning on using the shipping container’s doors for anything and will be modifying it with your own doors, you may not need to worry about this aspect of preparation.

Maintain Airflow

If your shipping container is going to be sitting for any length of time, you need to make sure it has airflow to the bottom of the container. Otherwise, the floor may rust out over time because of moisture.This can be as easy as placing cement or wooden blocks where the container is going to be set. You can also get special casters that attach to the bottom of your container.

4. Arrange for Delivery

The final step once your site is ready is to make arrangements for delivery. The size of the container and future location for it may determine which option you use.

Flatbed and tilt trailers can be used for any size shipping container. However, if you need a larger container manipulated into place and don’t have equipment on hand, you’ll want a truck with a crane.

Ready to Buy Your Shipping Container?

Now you know the four steps needed to buy shipping containers in Houston. As you can see, it’s as simple as figuring out what you need, giving us a call, and having it shipped to your home.

Contact us today, so we can help find the perfect shipping container for you.

Houston Shipping Containers Ready to Be Transported to Their Rightful Owners

Shipping Logistics: 6 Things You Need to Know

According to recent research, 49% of shoppers stated that they are more compelled to shop at a store that offers same day delivery. While this percentage continues to increase, it encourages business owners to learn a little bit more about shipping logistics.

With the coming of the new year, it’s time to start thinking of ways you can bring more business into your company. Fortunately, learning more about shipping logistics is the perfect way to start.

Here are 6 things every business owner should know about shipping logistics and how it could benefit their company.

1. Warehousing

You don’t have to have your own business in order to know that warehousing is one of the most important aspects. Because this is where all of your merchandise is stored, this is where freight shippers and receivers will spend a majority of their efforts.

2. Know Your Truckload Size

As your company begins to grow, you’ll soon realize that investing in a truck is going to be essential. Because your customer base is not only going to be limited to your local clients, there are trucks that you can purchase that will store 48′ – 53″ in trailer volume so that you are able to deliver nationally.

3. Get Familiar With Embargo

If you plan on shipping used containers to international customers, you should be aware of embargos. Each country has specific requirements that can prevent your product from being handled in their territory. When learning about shipping logistics, we encourage you to read on each country’s embargo laws so that you don’t run into any interruptions.

4. Making A Blind Shipment

Believe it or not, there are instances where both shipping and receiving parties are unaware of each other. Because of the Bill of Lading, you’re able to have all of the interactions between shipper, broker, carrier, and agent handled on a weekly, monthly, and/or annual basis.

5. Figuring Out Axle Load

One of the primary concern of all business owners is making sure that the merchandise gets to the required location with minimal damage to offset the costs. That’s why it is essential to verify how much weight each axle holds before driving your products on national highways.

6. Picking The Right Agent

When it comes to shipping logistics, choosing the right agent is going to be important. Because they are on the front line handling transactions and heavy decision making, you want to make sure that this person is reliable, responsible, and represents your company well.

Learn About Shipping Logistics And More!

Not only does Equipment Management Services specialize in shipping logistics, but also in renting and selling used containers to business owners like yourself. Since we’ve been in business, we have worked hard to create credible relationships with small business owners throughout Houston and Dallas. With over 20,000 shipping containers on ground, we know that we are able to meet the needs of our customers.

Have questions? Looking to purchase shipping containers? We’re here to help! Be sure to contact us and a member of our team will be more than happy to reach out to you.

container

Why You Shouldn’t Buy Shipping Containers for Your Business…Until After You’ve Read This!

Shipping containers are a viable solution for residential and commercial transportation/storage needs. They’re even a popular new-age housing option, thanks to their mobility and customization options. But, let’s focus on commercial use.

These modular metal units are weather-resistant, long-lasting, and relatively cheap. Also, they’re highly durable, so they’re suited for both short-term and long-term use.

If you intend to buy shipping containers, you’ll want to consider what their uses will be. You’ll want a container that’s both versatile and size-appropriate. Also, it’s important you determine the specific features you’ll require.

Once you have a basic idea of what you’re looking for, it’s time to do some research. We’re here to help you learn the facts of purchasing a shipping container for business use.

Obtain Necessary Permits

Since Texas is a major port of entry, it’s crucial you obtain a permit for maritime transportation. The Intermodal Shipping Container Port Permit allows you to ship out of Port of Houston and Port of Freeport.

If you plan to buy from a local or even national retailer, you won’t have to worry about this annual permit. But, depending on the location of your business, you may still need a permit from your neighborhood association. This grants you permission to keep a shipping unit on your property for an extended period of time.

Shop Online

Today, we often turn to the internet for our commercial purchases to save a few bucks. But, like every other industry, you’ll see there’s an overabundance of online retailers. This is where it helps to have a specific idea in mind of what you’re looking to buy. It’ll help you narrow down your choices to easily compare units that fit your company budget.

If you’re looking online, it’s still wise to go for vendors in your nearby area. You have to pay to transport your container, so ideally, you’ll find someone within a few miles.

Inspect Before You Buy Shipping Containers

No one likes to get hustled online and buy something of lesser value than the seller proclaimed. Before you do business with any vendor, inspect the shipping container to ensure it is in good condition.

You’ll want to make sure the doors and seals are intact. If either let air in, it’s probably a sign you’ll need to fix the lining. Make sure you bring up any inconsistencies like this when negotiating price, especially for used units.

Look for a unit with little-to-no rust. Especially if your shipping container is for storage, you don’t want to risk letting any water in. You should also inspect the interior for beams of light to identify any holes where water may come in.

For All Your Shipping Container Needs

Shipping containers are a large purchase, but they don’t have to be a gigantic hassle. Work with a reputable seller to find the best quality units that match your specific needs.

Looking to buy shipping containers? We’ve got you covered. Equipment Management Services offers a wide variety of both new and used units. Request a quote today to learn about the containers we have available for purchase and/or rent.

Tips to Ship for Less: How Your Business Can Save on the Cost of Shipping

With companies now spending around $1.5 trillion on shipping every year, businesses need a way to cut down on costs. If you’re looking to ship for less, there are lots of ways to save money without compromising quality. When looking to ship for less, use creative solutions that make sense for your customers.

Here are four tips to consider to cut costs.

1. Batch Shipments

If you’re constantly sending out little shipments to the same clients over and over, consider alternatives to save money. You could include free shipping with orders when your customers order over a certain limit. That allows your customers to think twice before making small orders.

It also incentivizes larger orders. By offering this small incentive, watch your shipping costs drop while your profits soar.

When customers make small orders, allow them to save money by batching orders together. If you don’t have all of your products in at the same time, you can ask them to wait until everything is in the same place to send one package instead of several.

2. Offer Local Pickup

One of the easiest ways to save on your shipping is to offer local pickup. If your customers have the opportunity to pick up items locally, you take away the entire expense of shipping to them. You give them the chance to see your facility up close and to get a real hands-on feel for your products.

This is a good way to build loyalty for your company and brand. When your customers and clients feel like they have access to your brand, even when they’re buying in bulk, they’ll feel more in control.

3. Own Your Vehicles

If you’re doing a lot of shipping in a local region, owning your own vehicles is a smart way to take control over how much you pay for shipping. When you own every step of the shipping apparatus, you don’t have to pay a middleman for your shipping. When you own your vehicles, it means you’ll deliver on your own schedule and under your own terms.

While it’s a big expenditure if you feel like you could handle lots of local shipments on your own, why not try taking it into your own hands?

4. Reuse Packaging

If you’re dealing with returns or getting deliveries of your own, why not reuse some of your packagings. The costs of packaging are expensive and if you’re not saving the packaging that you’re getting when things arrive at your facility.

While there are ways that look unprofessional, when it comes to packing peanuts and bubble wrap, no one will know if you’re resuming things.

Ship For Less Like a Savvy Businessperson

If you’re looking for ways to ship for less, you’re going to cut down on your overhead in a big way. Cutting down on shipping costs ensures that you don’t overspend without ever compromising the quality of service you provide customers. Always keep your customers as priority number one whenever you’re considering changes to the way you do business.

For larger shipping container issues, follow our guide to making the right fiscal decisions.

What’s in Store for the Future of Shipping and Logistics?

Local and regional shipping is one of the largest industries in the United States.

US shipping and logistics companies move over $4 trillion in goods every year. Businesses spend up to $99 billion in delivery costs to keep up with their customers’ demands.

With so much commerce at stake, it important to know what trends are in store for this busy trade. You can read further to find out how you can position your company to leverage these developments to your full advantage.

Shipping and Logistics Defined

Shipping and logistics are two terms that are usually intertwined. But they have their own unique meanings. Shipment means moving products from one place to another. Logistics refers to the processes you use to move these products between two points. These processes include ordering, purchasing, and warehousing.

Trends for the Future

Trends for the future of shipping and logistics look promising. Here are a few of them in a nutshell.

Automation and Technology

The logistics and shipping industry will always need a level of human interaction. Onsite human judgment calls can correct mistakes or prevent accidents.

Companies can automate other processes such as scheduling, payments, and pricing. Automating these features can help simplify these procedures for drivers and shippers.

Companies are using drones and robots to load commercial vehicles. Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) technology programs trucks to drive to their destination. Truck drivers never need to touch the steering wheel during the entire journey.

Transparency Shaped by Customer Experience

Consumers want to know where their products come from. They want to know how they’re made and moved. They want to know if manufacturing these products will hurt the environment.

The future of shipping depends on companies being able to answer these questions to an inquiring public. Companies now keep records that prove their products are eco-friendly and reduce waste. They’re also mindful of fair trade standards and pay fair prices to producers in developing countries.

Using Big Data to Make Better Decisions

Big data analytics provides a wealth of information on shipping for logistics companies. Logistics companies can get insights into routing and identifying obstacles in their supply chain model.

They can also streamline products and resources at the warehouse level.

Companies can use real-time traffic, climate, and fuel prices data to pinpoint optimal routes to a destination. They can also use predictive analytics to gauge consumer behavior and buying preferences.

Next Steps

The US shipping and logistics industry spent $1.5 trillion dollars in 2017 on its operations. Its the backbone for US retail sales which totaled over $5 trillion in 2017. Needless to say, the shipping industry is not going away any time soon and you need to be ready to anticipate it’s next direction.

If you’re ready to automate your existing shipping and logistics services, you can read more about ADAS truck technology here. You’ll learn all about ADAS’ breakthrough technology that improves efficiency and safety for commercial vehicles.

Don’t forget to check our blog for more helpful information on considerations for planning a shipping business. We’re experts in the shipping and maritime service industry.

Give us a call today!

Informational Things You Need to Know About Cargo Containers Before Buying One

The seaborne shipping trade around the world is worth about $12 trillion dollars, and container shipping accounts for about 60 percent of that trade. Is your company poised to participate in this massive market? If that is the case, you’ll need to purchase the right cargo containers from the right source.

Cargo containers may all look the same, but they’re actually not all alike. Before you make this investment, there’s some key information you should know. We’ve put together the essential basics right here — keep reading to learn what you need!

Buying Cargo Containers for Business Purposes

First, let’s take a look at the things you’ll need to know before you buy a cargo container for business shipping.

1. Specialty Containers Exist

The kind of container you should get depends on what you’ll be shipping. For example, if you’re shipping food items that could spoil or melt, you’ll want to look for climate-controlled options. If you’re shipping large machinery or other items that won’t pack well in standard containers, consider open-top containers instead.

For shipping vehicles such as boats, cars, or certain machinery, flat rack containers are your best choice. For liquids like oils or chemicals, you’ll need shipping tanks instead. And open-side containers work for certain vegetables that spoil in the wrong conditions, like potatoes.

2. Choose the Right Size

In addition to the type of container, you’ll also need to choose the proper size for your needs. Standard containers are often 8.5 feet high, while high cube containers are 9.5 feet high. The right size depends on what you’ll be shipping, as well as how much of it you’ll ship.

All shipping containers come in standardized sizes, which makes them easy to load and unload. For oddly-sized items, you’ll need one of the specialty container types listed above.

3. Consider Used or New

Plenty of used shipping container retailers can get you what you need at a discount. However, when you buy used, you might have a harder time finding the exact size and style you need. Thus, buying used is great if you’re buying a standard type of container. But for some specialty types, you might need to look for new containers.

4. Know the Shipping Methods

The goods you ship will usually make their journey in a number of different ways. First, they might travel via tractor-trailer across the land. Trucks can then load their containers directly onto cargo ships, to make the journey overseas. These large ocean ships follow fixed schedules and routes to save money while arriving on time.

Trains may also be used to ship goods on land — they’re actually more efficient than large trucks. Cranes can unload containers from a ship onto a train. Finally, smaller freight containers can get shipped by airplane. However, this option greatly limits how much you can ship at once, and it’s also much more expensive.

Buying Cargo Containers for Personal Use

Next, you might want a used or new cargo container for many non-business-related reasons. Here’s what you should know before you make the purchase.

1. Consider Storage

Storing your shipping container can pose its own challenges. Before you buy, check to see if you’ll need a permit to put a shipping container on your property. Typically, you’ll need a permit to store these containers in highly public spaces or residential areas. But if you live in a more rural area, you might not need a permit.

If you want to have the container on your property permanently, the requirements may be different than those for temporary storage. Know what you’re getting into before you buy, so you won’t get hit with fines or other trouble.

2. Know How Long You’ll Need it For

Often, it’s tempting to rent a container rather than buying one. But if you plan to use it for a couple of years or more, it makes more financial sense to buy one. When you buy a shipping container for personal use, it’s helpful to have the option to customize and make changes to it. Why rent a container that you have to send back intact, when you could buy one and modify it exactly how you want?

3. Get Your Site Ready

You’ll need to prep the permanent site of your shipping container before it arrives. The exact prep depends on what you’ll use the container for, and how long it will be there. Dry, level land won’t need much, or any prep, before it can host a shipping container. But damp or uneven land might need to get filled or regraded first. Land that’s rocky, sloped, or prone to floods is never good for a shipping container. Choose the space wisely, and you’ll have less work to do in the end.

4. Think About Security

Some shipping containers have built-in security measures. These can be helpful if you plan to use the container for purposes like storage. If your container doesn’t have a lock, you can also buy an exterior bolt lock for protection. However, some containers come with interior locking mechanisms instead, or you can have one installed. These offer better security since they can’t be destroyed with a pair of bolt cutters.

You might need different locking mechanisms altogether if you plan to turn your container into a home or business. In this case, you’ll probably need to install doors and windows with more standard lock styles.

5. Buy the Right Features

Just as with shipping containers for business purposes, you should also consider the features of a container for personal use. Look for door entry options, shelving, windows, and other features that will make your container easier to work with. You can also buy from a brand that offers container modifications.

Where to Find Cargo Containers

Now that you have a clear idea of what you need, it’s time to find the company that sells the right cargo containers at a reasonable price. Did you know that you can find shipping containers for both business and personal use at just one retailer? We’ve got the containers to meet all kinds of needs — learn more about what we have to offer here!